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  • #31
    He is that bombastic b:::::::d that was still laying in his pram sucking his dummy while I was fishing the Wye all those years ago.

    And probably you was also, but now he has grown up a bit ( he probably plays with worry beads now) he says us oldies know nothing,
    But I think I still can tell bull::::t when its being served up.

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    • #32
      The Wye has definately been won. All that fencing and cutting trees down so that you can plant them back again has finally paid dividends. I can catagorically say that this season must be the best for sea lampreys for years. I was treading on them all over the place yesterday. I gather that the Severn is having a good run of elvers this year. Do they have "habitat improvement" on the Severn as well?

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      • #33
        It seems that the population of sea lamprey was never under threat

        Features such as weirs and dams, as well as polluted sections of river, may impede migration to spawning grounds. In comparison to River lamprey sea lampreys seem to be relatively poor at ascending obstacles to migration.
        The species occurs in estuaries and easily accessible rivers over much of the Atlantic coastal area of western and northern Europe
        the Wye has had no impassable weirs for over 100 years.

        Sea Lamprey is the only species currently deemed to be in favourable conservation status within the Wye SAC, which has one of the healthiest populations of this species in the UK and provides exceptional quality habitat in the main stem of the Wye. In the Irfon the population is confined to the main stem below Llanwrtyd Wells and the lower reaches of the large tributaries. The ISAC project will help maintain this status
        from here

        even so there will be more of everything of course, who will count them I wonder?

        The in-channel improvements that will be carried out in ISAC will have the most significant impact on the Lampreys. In sections of river where the natural geomorphology is severely damaged, recovery will be assisted through a variety of processes, including:
        • - hardening of banks with timber, and
        • - the establishment of natural pool/riffle sequences assisted by the addition of and fixing of coarse woody debris (CWD)
        • - Construction of high water refugia
        This work will be targeted at creating extra ammoceote habitat for all three species of lamprey, resulting in an expected increase in numbers of fluviatilis/planeri by at least 2,500 and the knock on downstream improvements to Petromyzon marinus are estimated to result in a minimum of 100 extra returning adults.
        The habitat for the ammocoete (young) is the silty margins
        Last edited by stealth_fox; 09-06-13, 11:12 AM.

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        • #34
          The Wye has definately been won, There was very heavy runs going under Glasbury bridge yesterday, There was red ones, green ones, blue ones
          grey ones all with some kind of lice attached. and some were certainly 30+ amongst the small ones, and nobody was there with a flying C to interfere
          with their passage.

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          • #35
            More canoes than salmon SD?

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            • #36
              SF, I think if we had one Salmon for every three hundred canoes we would have plenty of fish in the pools.

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